From a photograph by Solomon D. Butcher of four daughters of rancher Joseph M. Chrisman, at their sod house in Custer County, Nebraska. From left to right, Harriet, Elizabeth, Lucie, and Ruth. Photographed in 1886.

Sunday, November 26, 2006

Snowflake Photography

And What I Think About It...



The December issue of Better Homes and Gardens has an article about the wonderful snowflake photography of Kenneth G. Libbrecht, a professor of physics at CalTech.

You may see some of Professor Libbrecht's snowflakes in your mailbox because the U.S. Postal Service has recently issued a series of stamps that feature his photos. Austria's postal service also has a set of snowflake stamps with Libbrecht's images.

The BH&G article suggests printing Libbrecht's snowflake images to make your own Christmas cards and stickers. I assume this is within the bounds of what his copyright restrictions allow. Surely they checked with him before printing these craft ideas!

The professor's snowflake website, snowcrystals.com, is an interesting blend of scientific facts and gorgeous photos. He explains how he took the pictures, and he gives advice about the best places to study snow, as well as describing some interesting snow activities and experiments for scientists of all ages. It's well worth a visit.

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3 comments:

Larry Ayers said...

Thanks for the tip about Libbrecht and snowcrystals.com. Some wonderful photos there!

Genevieve said...

I'm glad you followed the link, Larry. I really enjoyed the photos. Very cool.

Peggi Meyer Graminski said...

I'll be following that link too, in a moment - I am a BIG snow lover, but unfortunately haven't gotten to see any "real" snow for a while ... thanks much for posting the link =)

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