From a photograph by Solomon D. Butcher of four daughters of rancher Joseph M. Chrisman, at their sod house in Custer County, Nebraska. From left to right, Harriet, Elizabeth, Lucie, and Ruth. Photographed in 1886.

Friday, September 26, 2008

Peeling Boiled Eggs

Helpful hint for adventurous cooks


Oh, the amazing stuff that arrives via e-mail.

Tonight, Cynthia sent a tip about peeling boiled eggs. The way to do it,  according to time-management expert Tim Ferris, is:

- Add a teaspoon of baking soda to the cooking water.
- Cool the eggs in ice water.
- Crack and remove a bit of the eggshell at each end of an egg.
- Blow through the hole in the small end and the egg will pop through the hole in the large end.

You say you doubt it?  This website shows Tim Ferris demonstrating his egg-blowing technique and gives step by step instructions.

It reminds me of that experiment in grade-school science class where the hard-boiled egg was sucked into the soda bottle.  In both cases, air pressure moves the egg.  The amazing part is the malleability of a boiled egg.

(Updated this after I thought a little about why the egg decides to move out of its shell.)

3 comments:

RunAwayImagination said...

That is the coolest trick ever! I can't wait to try it.

heelers said...

I learn something new every day.
At least I do when I drop by your blog.
J

ptg said...

I remember the egg in the bottle trick from my school days.

Air pressure is amazing. When Turks slaughter sheep at home, they blow air in under the skin to separate it from the flesh. It makes skinning them a breeze.

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