From a photograph by Solomon D. Butcher of four daughters of rancher Joseph M. Chrisman, at their sod house in Custer County, Nebraska. From left to right, Harriet, Elizabeth, Lucie, and Ruth. Photographed in 1886.

Saturday, August 21, 2010

U.S. Agriculture in the Early 1900s

Farm and ranch statistics and photos from 100 years ago




The statistics below are quoted from World Geographies: Second Book, Kentucky Edition (pp. 202-206) by Ralph S. Tarr and Frank M. McMurry, published in New York by the MacMillan Company in 1922.

I scanned the photos in this post from the same old book. I hoped to find photos that complemented the statistics, but no photos were available for some categories, such as hogs, horses, and hay. I finally decided to just scan some of the most interesting pictures of agriculture, whether or not they are related to the numbers. It's impossible to know when the photos were taken, but it seems likely that they were more up-to-date at the time of publishing than the statistics were.

We don't properly appreciate the availability of statistics that we enjoy today. Imagine -- when the authors were writing this book, around 1920, they used farm statistics from a full decade earlier. If newer numbers had been available, surely the publisher would have insisted on an update!


The six leading corn-producing states in 1910
Bushels producedValue
Illinois 414,812,000$157,629,000
Iowa 343,870,000$123,793,000
Missouri273,900,000$120,516,000
Texas181,280,000$114,206,000
Indiana201,216,000$201,216,000
Kansas169,100,000$169,100,000



(Corn photos from two different sections of the book.
The main reason that the corn grew tall in favorable
conditions was that the gene for tall corn popped up
frequently in the open-pollinated corn of that era.)

The six leading wheat-producing states in 1910

Bushels producedValue
Minnesota 94,080,000$88,435,000
Kansas62,068,000$52,137,000
South Dakota46,720,000$41,581,000
Indiana40,981,000$35,653,000
North Dakota36,105,000$32,494,000
Nebraska35,124,000$31,612,000


The six leading cotton-producing states in 1910
500-lb. bales produced
Texas3,140,000
Georgia1,750,000
Alabama1,174,000
Mississippi1,160,000
South Carolina1,116,000
Oklahoma  900,000


The six leading sugar-producing sections in the U.S. and its dependencies in 1910. (Colorado, beet sugar; all others, cane sugar)

Long tons produced
Colorado1,122,117 
Hawaii  485,000 
Porto Rico [sic]  320,000 
Louisiana  300,000 
Philippines  150,000 
Texas   11,000 


The six leading hay-producing states in 1910
Tons producedValue
New York6,351,000$87,009,000
Pennsylvania4,443,000$66,495,000
Ohio3,948,000$49,350,000
Michigan3,370,000$45,832,000
Illinois3,717,000$44,604,000
Iowa3,780,000$36,288,000


The six leading hog-producing states in 1910

Number producedValue
Iowa7,527,153$69,535,997
Illinois4,683,577$36,182,639
Missouri4,429,429$31,878,568
Nebraska3,434,938$29,642,092
Kansas2,997,319$24,681,180
Indiana3,619,906$23,739,586


The six leading milk-producing states in 1910. (Based on statistics giving number of dairy cows and production per cow.)

Gallons produced
New York783,479,286
Wisconsin667,497,765
Iowa489,563,616
Pennsylvania411,735,240
Minnesota407,020,500
Illinois395,934,071


The six leading cattle-producing states in 1910
StateCattle producedValue
Texas 6,721,502$129,130,917
Iowa4,638,422$118,991,384
New York2,421,593 $83,015,622
Kansas3,066,337 $80,184,162
Nebraska2,931,255 $73,048,897
Missouri2,556,420 $72,731,694


The six leading sheep-producing states in 1910
StateSheep producedValue
Wyoming5,394,959$29,648,616
Montana5,372,639$28,999,239
Idaho2,950,534$15,631,797
Ohio3,907,055$14,932,790
Oregon2,696,779$12,197,477
New Mexico3,264,012$11,905,380

This image was posted previously with
a description of sheep raising in 1920.

The six leading horse-producing states in 1910
StateHorses producedValue
Iowa1,489,225$177,658,734
Illinois1,450,406$163,062,351
Missouri1,070,913$113,707,841
Kansas1,144,870$112,543,535
Nebraska1,006,550$102,706,582
Ohio  910,271 $98,853,108

No comments:

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

CONTENTMENT: Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, sing often, pray always, forget self, think of others and their feelings, fill your heart with love, scatter sunshine. These are the tried links in the golden chain of contentment.
(Author unknown)

IT IS STILL BEST to be honest and truthful; to make the most of what we have; to be happy with simple pleasure; and to be cheerful and have courage when things go wrong.
(Laura Ingalls Wilder, 1867-1957)

Thanks for reading.