From a photograph by Solomon D. Butcher of four daughters of rancher Joseph M. Chrisman, at their sod house in Custer County, Nebraska. From left to right, Harriet, Elizabeth, Lucie, and Ruth. Photographed in 1886.

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Thursday 13: Needlework Idioms

Figures of speech, related to sewing and needlework


"Lise Sewing" by Renoir, Dallas Museum of Art

1. Revolution is part of the fabric of South American history.

2. The room was so quiet that you could hear a pin drop.

3. The peace accords are unraveling.

4. The contract is all sewed up.

5. The partnership is coming apart at the seams.

6. He needled his wife about her driving.

7. I'm tired, and my nerves are frayed.

8. He looks a bit frayed around the edges.

9. Her jokes had me in stitches.

10. That story's made out of whole cloth.

11. The two boys are cut from the same cloth.

12. This deal is hanging by a thread.

13. Finding his homework in his room was like looking for a needle in a haystack.

If you have a sewing or needlework idiom, please add it in the comments!

2 comments:

Keely said...

A stitch in time saves nine.

Anonymous said...

I don't know if this would pretain to sewing or not but my husband's Grandmother, Mama Reynolds, had a saying that meant something was just unbelievable. The saying was:
"If that doesn't take the rag off the bush." I head Festus on Gunsmoke use that term once and he is the only one besides Mama Reynolds I have heard say that.
My understanding is that old time people who didn't have clothes line dried their clothes on shrubs or bushes.

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CONTENTMENT: Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, sing often, pray always, forget self, think of others and their feelings, fill your heart with love, scatter sunshine. These are the tried links in the golden chain of contentment.
(Author unknown)

IT IS STILL BEST to be honest and truthful; to make the most of what we have; to be happy with simple pleasure; and to be cheerful and have courage when things go wrong.
(Laura Ingalls Wilder, 1867-1957)

Thanks for reading.