From a photograph by Solomon D. Butcher of four daughters of rancher Joseph M. Chrisman, at their sod house in Custer County, Nebraska. From left to right, Harriet, Elizabeth, Lucie, and Ruth. Photographed in 1886.

Saturday, March 17, 2007

The Country Boy's Creed

The natural life


The Country Boy's Creed

I believe that the Country which God made is more beautiful than the City which man made; that life out of doors and in touch with the earth is the natural life of man.

I believe that work is work wherever I find it, but that work with nature is more inspiring than work with the most intricate machinery.

I believe that the dignity of labor depends not on what you do but on how you do it; that opportunity comes to the boy on the farm as often as to a boy in the city; that life is larger and freer and happier on the farm than in town; that my success depends not upon my location, but upon myself.

I believe in working when you work, and playing when you play, and in giving and demanding a square deal in every act of life."

-- Northwest Journal of Education

Source: Kentucky Arbor and Bird Day 1914-1915, compiled by Mrs. V. O. Gilbert. Published in Frankfort, Kentucky by the State Journal Company, no publishing or copyright date given.


I doubt we'd see such an idealized view of rural life published in a journal of education today. The life of the average American child has changed in many, many ways since 1915!

Bar
Related post: The Farmer's Creed -- and Its Author, Frank I. Mann

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CONTENTMENT: Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, sing often, pray always, forget self, think of others and their feelings, fill your heart with love, scatter sunshine. These are the tried links in the golden chain of contentment.
(Author unknown)

IT IS STILL BEST to be honest and truthful; to make the most of what we have; to be happy with simple pleasure; and to be cheerful and have courage when things go wrong.
(Laura Ingalls Wilder, 1867-1957)

Thanks for reading.