From a photograph by Solomon D. Butcher of four daughters of rancher Joseph M. Chrisman, at their sod house in Custer County, Nebraska. From left to right, Harriet, Elizabeth, Lucie, and Ruth. Photographed in 1886.

Monday, February 26, 2007

1951 Ford F5 Truck (Cab Over Engine)

History and Old Stuff...



I saw an old truck (scroll down for photos) on a vacant lot in Hopkinsville today. I hope I have identified it correctly as a 1951 Ford F5. I am certain that it is a Ford F5, because it is engraved in chrome on the truck. The question is the year, and I have looked at a bunch of vintage Ford photos trying to figure it out.

I was a little confused because the grill and front end on this old truck seemed to be like the 1951 Ford F5, but all the photos showed a truck with a much longer front end.

I finally decided that the short profile of this one's front end indicates it was a cab-over-engine model. I found documentation for cab-over-engine Mack trucks as early as 1905, so the concept was old stuff by 1951.

I was born in 1951, so I'm the same age as the truck. I hope I don't look as rough as it does! I do think the rust and the various paint hues make an interesting palette.

If you have an opinion on the make and model, please post it in the comments. Thanks.


1951 Ford F5 Truck Cab over Engine1951 Ford F5 Truck Cab over Engine



1951 Ford F5 Truck Cab over Engine1951 Ford F5 Truck Cab over Engine


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On February 26, 2006, a year ago today, I posted about Gaskell's Compendium of Forms (a beautiful old book) and about windmills. No writer's block that day!

8 comments:

Tudorw said...

Excellent photos of a vintage truck. You have captured beautifully the myriad colors etched by Father Time.

Genevieve said...

John, you take such beautiful photos that I feel really honored by your kind words. Thank you.

Collagemama said...

What a great truck! I pulled up to a stop light yesterday, and got all excited looking at the vehicle parked at the gas station. It was painted with gray primer, but someone was obviously working to restore it. Just for a sec I thought I'd found a 1961 Plymouth. When I pulled into the gas station for a serious gander, it turned out to be an Oldsmobile. Oh, well. Hope springs eternal.

Genevieve said...

Yes, for some reason that old truck really appeals to me. Its snub nose makes it look more old-fashioned than the regular trucks of the same year, in my opinion. I can just imagine it tootling down the road about 40 or 45 mph. I'll bet it got less than 10 mpg.

Roger said...

Hi, great old truck! However, it's a 1952, instead of a '51. You can tell, because the work "FORD" is right under the hood, and the centerpiece of the hood is different, than the '51. It is indeed a COE, or "Cab Over Engine", and F5 is correct. I have a 1951 F2, with the longer nose. You can see my restoration project here:
http://www.crbest.com

Sure wish I had one like that, as well!!

Roger said...

Ooops, above comment link should be:

http://www.crbest.com/bodywork

Sorry,

Roger

Genevieve said...

Thanks, Roger. You sound like you know what you're talking about. :)

Anonymous said...

Roger is correct that the truck is a 1952 for the reasons he stated. A 51 ford has the V8 symbol where the FORD is placed and FORD lettering is on the hood trim in front instead of the V8 emblem. On the hood side trim the bar showing the F number the 1952 stainless is smooth and the 1951 stainless has ribbing on it. The "COE"s are far less common than regular cabs and harder to work on. The reason for the design was you could have a longer bed on a given wheelbase. There are also harder riding because you sit very close to the front axle and the seat was also firmer than the regular cab. RWC

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