From a photograph by Solomon D. Butcher of four daughters of rancher Joseph M. Chrisman, at their sod house in Custer County, Nebraska. From left to right, Harriet, Elizabeth, Lucie, and Ruth. Photographed in 1886.

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

Clover "Honey"

The Rural Life... More About Trees and Plants...



Red clover

This is a great "simple syrup" for pancakes, waffles or biscuits. It's fun to make a batch and enjoy the clover flavor. I know this isn't my recipe blog, but it's such an interesting recipe, I thought some might enjoy reading it.

Ingredients:
100 red and/or white clover blossoms
5 lbs. granulated sugar
1 1/2 pints water
1 teaspoon powdered alum

Directions:
Collect the clover blossoms from an area where you are sure they have not been sprayed with chemicals. (Alfalfa blossoms may be added as well.) Remove the green leaflets and stems from the blossoms and rinse them thoroughly in cold water.

Prepare the canning jars and lids.

Stir the sugar and water together in a large saucepan and heat to boiling, stirring frequently. When the sugar mixture comes to a full boil, cook it until the syrup becomes clear. Add the alum and boil 2 more minutes. Remove from heat.

Add the clover blossoms to the hot syrup, stirring very gently to settle them into the mixture. Cover the syrup and allow the blossoms to steep for 10 min. Strain the syrup through a sieve to remove the blossoms.

Reheat the syrup to a full boil. Fill sterilized jars leaving 1/2" headroom; process in a boiling water bath for 5 min.

VARIATION: For a smaller batch, use 20-25 clover blossoms, 1 lb. sugar, 1/2 c. plus 2 Tbsp. water, and 1/4 tsp. alum. Fill sterilized jars. Process in boiling water bath, or seal and store in the refrigerator to be used within a couple weeks.


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4 comments:

Bonita said...

Just dropping by from Sarpy Sam's, and noticed your post on syrup-making. When I lived in Montana I made sarvisberry syrup (from the bushes up in the mountains) and cherry syrup (from my parents orchard). Here in Washington I gather the blackberries for jam and syrup.

Prairie Bluestem is a great name for your blog....it fits.

Genevieve said...

I'm so glad you came for a visit. :) When the kids were little, we went on a clover-blossom expedition several summers and made this syrup. It's great! I try to watch my sugar intake nowadays, though, so I'll use the small recipe if I make it this summer.

KennethF said...

Hey Gene,

I recently have read 'ALOT' about honey bees and such as about honey:

1 tsp.= 1 bee's life-time collection
1 lb. = 1,000,000 flower visits
1 day = 10,000 visits (younger bee)

Your "clover honey" has me wondering at just how long one batch might last the average bear? :)

I stopped eating all unnatural suger and feel much better.

Truly in delight, KennethF

Genevieve said...

There's just no flavor like honey. I love it! This syrup picks up the clover flavor, and it's really good, but it's not made by bees so it's not honey.

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CONTENTMENT: Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, sing often, pray always, forget self, think of others and their feelings, fill your heart with love, scatter sunshine. These are the tried links in the golden chain of contentment.
(Author unknown)

IT IS STILL BEST to be honest and truthful; to make the most of what we have; to be happy with simple pleasure; and to be cheerful and have courage when things go wrong.
(Laura Ingalls Wilder, 1867-1957)

Thanks for reading.