From a photograph by Solomon D. Butcher of four daughters of rancher Joseph M. Chrisman, at their sod house in Custer County, Nebraska. From left to right, Harriet, Elizabeth, Lucie, and Ruth. Photographed in 1886.

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

Voices of the Sandhills

Life in The Nebraska Sandhills...



Updated 6-22-06

Voices of the Sandhills

Several people who read this blog are interested in the Nebraska Sandhills, so I thought I'd mention an interesting little newspaper, Voices of the Sandhills, that is published in Tryon, Nebraska.

This little newspaper is found in Nebraska restaurants and hotels, free for the taking. I've read and enjoyed it while touring through northern Nebraska, and my girlfriend has sent me more issues from time to time.

It features "Western History and Early Day Pictures". Here are some article topics from a few issues:

  • 1000 Mile Horse Race From Chadron, Nebraska to Chicago, Illinois
  • Naming the Town of Hyannis
  • History of the Arikaras
  • Common Sandhill Bachelor's Headquarters Described
  • Some Early Day Food Preparations Explained
  • Once Again The Horse Is An Unsung Hero
  • General Drum Feels The Sorrow of Chief Spotted Tail
  • Most of John Nelson's Problems Caused by His Many Wives

I believe it is published quarterly. I called to inquire, and a pleasant lady whose voice sounds like my Aunt Becky told me that the current subscription rate (as of June, 2006) is $9.50 per year. The newspaper itself is free and the fee covers the costs of postage and handling.

I have been talking about subscribing for quite a while. I made out the check this morning and put in a stamped envelope. Now all I have to do is get it to the mailbox!

The mailing address is:

Sowders
HC6 Box 108
Tryon, NE 69157

Telephone: 308-587-2333


Near Arthur, NebraskaNear Arthur, Nebraska
About 40 miles west of Tryon


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5 comments:

RunAwayImagination said...

I've been meaning for some time to contact the folks at the Gordon Journal for articles about my ancestors. I may have to travel there one day to rummage through their archives.

Those small town rags report on everything. I still have copies from the week in 1974 when I brought my family to Gordon for a visit. My step-grandmother Edna cooked us her usual Sunday dinner, and several relatives came in from surrounding farms to join us. Included in the next issue of the Journal was an article describing the dinner and listing everyone who was present, including the out-of-towners (us!).

This was quite a culture shock for someone who was raised in the suburbs of Washington, DC and whose daily newspaper, the Washington Post, typically reported on national and international news, with a small section devoted to the entire Metro area. No room for Sunday suppers in the Post, unless they included international luminaries.

I've always regarded that part of the country as exotic and interesting, because everything about it is so different from where I was raised. On the other hand, people who've lived all their lives in the Sandhills regard us city folks similarly. That's the impression I retained from the summers of 1959-60 that I spent there with my granddad and Edna.

I love your blog, because (1) you speak of things that most of us don't even notice and (2) you have a very relaxed and warm writing style. You really should consider writing for publication.

Genevieve said...

Yes, the small newspapers print the news of all the little communities -- who had dinner with whom, and who traveled to Omaha, and who had their grandchildren for a week. If you know the folks, you can sometimes read a lot between the lines. :)

That's one thing that our local newspaper here can't seem to understand. We can get national news from a zillion different sources, but local news is only available from a few sources. I am really disgusted with them when every story on the front page is a national story (every Monday!)

When I was at Gordon, I went to the courthouse to ask what building had been my grandfather Marc Eaton's livery stable. The folks there were very friendly and helpful. Likewise with the people at the cemetery!

Roy said...

I picked up a copy of your little paper "Canada to Mexico...via Highway 83" at a store on Hiway 83 at Concan Texas, and I really enjoyed it.

While reading the paper it occurred to me that Hiway 83 has been a big part of my wife's life. My wife was born just west of 83 in Oklahoma east of Hooker. She and I lived the first 45 years of our married life less than three miles from Hiway 83 in Harlingen and McAllen, TX. In 1972 we purchased a lot for a vacation home one mile from Hiway 83 near Leakey, TX. That is where we live now. In 1979 our granddaughter was born in Oakley, KS.

Genevieve said...

Roy, I don't know why your comment had a glitch. I approved it, but it never posted properly. Here is what you said:

I picked up a copy of your little paper "Canada to Mexico...via Highway 83" at a store on Hiway 83 at Concan Texas, and I really enjoyed it.

While reading the paper it occurred to me that Hiway 83 has been a big part of my wife's life. My wife was born just west of 83 in Oklahoma east of Hooker. She and I lived the first 45 years of our married life less than three miles from Hiway 83 in Harlingen and McAllen, TX. In 1972 we purchased a lot for a vacation home one mile from Hiway 83 near Leakey, TX. That is where we live now. In 1979 our granddaughter was born in Oakley, KS.


Please understand that I don't have any connection to Voices of the Sandhills, whatsoever. It is an excellent publication, but I can't take any credit for it! I hope you enjoyed your visit to Prairie Bluestem, and I invite you to return for another visit soon.

Genevieve said...

Well, I'll be darned. There's your comment, showing up at last!

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